Cherry Angioma Removal Guide

Have you heard of cherry angiomas? Maybe you haven’t heard that term, but you have probably seen what they look like.

I remember the first time I spotted one. It was this small red spot on my skin. Upon first seeing it, I was really worried, as I am with any sign of a skin abnormality. I didn’t know what it was, where it came from, or what it meant. It wasn’t just surface-related, as I couldn’t wash it off (but believe me, I tried!). A visit to my dermatologist cleared things up. She called it a cherry angioma, which I later found can also be called Campbell de Morgan spots or senile angiomas (I like the cherry name best). Thankfully, I received the wonderful news that they’re harmless. My next question, though, was how can I remove a cherry angioma?

First,

What Are Cherry Angiomas?

A cherry angioma is a type of skin growth, a very common one, in fact. They will not always be raised, it is possible that you’ll have one that is even with your skin. You can find one anywhere on your body, but you are most likely to spot them on your trunk (torso), shoulders, or arms. A cherry angioma will be a bright red color (hence the name) and circular. They are usually very small, even as small as a pinprick, but can have a diameter as large as a ¼ inch. They don’t hurt and don’t cause any problem, though they can bleed if they are irritated, such as from being scratched.

What Causes Cherry Angiomas?

There is no known cause for cherry angiomas, but it is believed that genetics plays a role in it. Pregnancy, climate, and chemical exposure have also been referenced as being contributing factors. While you can get them at any age, they tend to start showing up once someone reaches the age of 30 and are more likely to start increasing in size and number as someone ages.

Should I See A Doctor For Cherry Angiomas?

If you find a new growth on your skin, it is always wise to pay a visit to your dermatologist. They will able to tell you exactly what a new growth is and if it is anything to be worried about. If you already know that you have a cherry angioma, you’ll want to visit your dermatologist if it suddenly changes in size or color (just like with moles).

Do Cherry Angiomas Need To Be Removed?

One thing everyone should know is that a cherry angioma doesn’t need to be removed. They are benign growths and not tumorous. Also, they do not cause pain, further health problems, or difficulties. They tend to be very small and usually are not very noticeable. However, while a cherry angioma doesn’t need to be removed, there are cases where you might want them to be removed.

When Is A Cherry Angioma Removal Recommended?

Cherry angioma removal is recommended in cases where it bleeds frequently, due to being in a location that regularly causes an irritation that results in it. This can result in embarrassment and is just a pain to continually deal with it.

In other cases, some people just worry about having a skin growth like this. While they are harmless, they can still be worrisome for some people. And for others, they just do not like the appearance of a cherry angioma and want it gone. If any of these apply to you, you can speak with your doctor about your medical options or look into natural methods for a cherry angioma removal.

Medical Cherry Angioma Removal Options

There are several medical options for a cherry angioma removal. You’ll want to speak with your dermatologist about what they feel will be the best method for your particular case. This is also a good time to discuss all of the benefits and possible risks. Overall, these methods are not seen as risky. It is good to note, though, that these can result in scars, but they are not very likely.

Excision 

In this method, a doctor will cut the cherry angioma off the surface of your skin, called a shave excision. This method is used for the removal of other growths, as well, such as a mole. A local anesthetic is given so you do not feel any pain during the procedure, but the shot for the anesthetic can cause some pain. The aftercare is simple and there usually is not a lot of pain during the healing process.

Cryotherapy

This method is performed by freezing the cherry angioma using liquid nitrogen. This is also a method used for wart removal, if you are familiar with that. This method is very quick, and usually involves little pain (especially if your doctor uses a topical numbing agent), and has the lowest risk of infection of all of the medical options.

Electrocautery

This method is the opposite of cryotherapy. Rather than freezing the cherry angioma, this method burns it. It is a quick procedure that uses a small, pen-like probe with an electrical current to burn the area of concern. An anesthetic may be given and could be topical or an injection. Pain usually isn’t experienced during the healing process.

Laser Surgery

Laser surgery is similar to electrocautery in that it is using heat to get rid of the cherry angioma. The tool used is specifically called a pulsed-dye laser (PDL). The PDL uses a yellow, concentrated laser that generates heat to remove the cherry angioma. This method is very quick and causes little pain, but will cause bruising. It is also important to note that it may require more than one session to get rid of it.

Natural Cherry Angioma Removal Options

If you have a cherry angioma that you want to get rid of, but are not interested in the medical options available, there are natural methods that people have found helpful. These home remedies are very easy to use, inexpensive, and you may already have the ingredients on hand.

Iodine

You are likely already acquainted with iodine, due to its relationship with salt. You probably have salt with iodine in your kitchen. There has been some thought that a cherry angioma could be the result of an iodine deficiency. Due to this, increasing your intake of iodine can help the situation. While this has not been scientifically proven to help with a cherry angioma removal, people have had success with it and there have not been reports of any issues using this method. Additionally, iodine is helpful in other areas, such as thyroid health.

Since increasing the amount of salt you intake wouldn’t be very healthy, it is important to know what other options you have for iodine. There are a number of foods that you can eat that have iodine in them. These include sea vegetables, scallops, cod, yogurt, shrimp, and others. What’s great is that all of these offer other health benefits, too. For example, the seafood options are all high in B12, which helps with energy, cardiovascular health, and more. Wherever possible, it is important to get your nutrients from actual food sources. However, that is not always possible for reasons including dietary restrictions and lack of accessibility.

In cases where natural sources aren't possible, taking an iodine supplement would be a great alternative. There are many different options for iodine supplements, many of which are combined with other beneficial vitamins. They are commonly found in pill form. However, for those that do not like swallowing pills, there are liquid supplements for iodine. Your standard multi-vitamin may have it, so it’s worth checking what you already have on hand. Before starting a new supplement, it is a good idea to speak with your doctor.

Apple Cider Vinegar

If you are a regular user of natural remedies, or even if you have just looked into it before, you have likely heard of apple cider vinegar and all of the healthy benefits it has. It can help with different diseases, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, aid in weight loss, act as a disinfectant, and more.

In addition to these things, apple cider vinegar can help with a cherry angioma removal. Many people have had a lot of success with this method and you’ll find that people endorse its use. The acetic acid in apple cider vinegar is one of the things that make it so beneficial, which comes from the fermentation process of the apples. One of the things this and other acids help with is better absorption of minerals from the foods you eat.

To use it to help with a cherry angioma removal, you’ll want to take a clean cloth, cotton ball, or something similar and dip it into some of your apple cider vinegar. Once you’ve done that, you’ll apply it to your cherry angioma. Keep this applied for about 30 minutes or so. This process will need to be repeated, so be sure to do this daily. You’ll soon see signs that it is working to remove your cherry angioma.

While this is a daily process, it doesn’t use a lot of the vinegar at once, so you don’t need to be concerned with it quickly running out or anything like that. Additionally, apple cider vinegar is very inexpensive if you don’t already have any on hand; you can even find it at most dollar stores. You will still have a lot left over after using it for your cherry angioma removal, but there are a lot of different things you can use it for. It is great to use in a homemade salad dressing or in a marinade, for example.

Tea Tree Oil

This is another one of those items that you are likely familiar with if you are into natural remedies or essential oils. In addition to its benefits in a cherry angioma removal, tea tree oil is helpful for acne, infections, psoriasis, lice, athlete's foot, and more. Additionally, it can be used as a pest deterrent, cleaner, mouthwash, washing machine cleanser, and more.

When it comes to using it for a cherry angioma removal, it is used topically in a similar way to apple cider vinegar. Unlike apple cider vinegar, though, it is not used alone. To use the tea tree oil to remove your cherry angioma, you’ll want to mix it with some olive oil, approximately 1 part tea tree oil to 2 parts olive oil. Coconut oil can be used in place of the olive oil if that is what you have on hand or if it is your preference. Take the mixture and apply it to your skin on the cherry angioma. You’ll want to do this daily, at least once a day under you see its effects at removing your cherry angioma.

It takes very little of the mixture, so even if you make it with just a teaspoon or tablespoon of tea tree oil, you will have plenty leftover to use over the days.


While a cherry angioma can be unsightly, thankfully, they are not harmful to you. Even though they are not harmful, there are plenty of reasons someone might want one removed. There are many options someone can use for a cherry angioma removal, including medical options and natural healing ones.

So, what about you? Have you had a cherry angioma? If so, what did you do about it? If not, what do you think you would do?

Photo Credit: Cherry Angioma by Joseph K.

One Comment

  1. Very neat article post. Really Cool.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*